VFW has banners for families of service men and women

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Messenger photo by Kristy Zurbrick Members of West Jefferson Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7005 display Blue Star banners, available at no charge to family members of service men and women: (from left) Terry Arbogast, post commander; Dave Cunningham, member of the post house committee and the Madison County Veterans Commission representing Vietnam veterans; Don Coonfare, quartermaster; and Ron Clark, senior vice commander.
Messenger photo by Kristy Zurbrick
Members of West Jefferson Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7005 display Blue Star banners, available at no charge to family members of service men and women: (from left) Terry Arbogast, post commander; Dave Cunningham, member of the post house committee and the Madison County Veterans Commission representing Vietnam veterans; Don Coonfare, quartermaster; and Ron Clark, senior vice commander.

(Posted May 20, 2014)

By Kristy Zurbrick, Madison Editor

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7005 in West Jefferson is offering Blue Star banners to anyone who has an immediate family member serving in the military anywhere in the country or around the world.

Traditionally hung in the window of a home, the banner lets anyone who passes by know the family has a member serving in the Armed Forces during a time of war or hostility.

“The idea to keep a supply of banners on hand came to us when a lady asked where to get them for her son who was going back to Afghanistan for the third time,” said Don Coonfare, post quartermaster.

Ron Clark, senior vice commander, said he displays a Blue Star banner in his home’s front window in honor of his son, Todd, a sergeant in the Army serving with a transportation company in Germany.

The banners are available at no charge. Call (614) 879-6333 or stop by the VFW post, 1 Veterans Way, West Jefferson.

History of the Blue Star banner

Army Captain Robert L. Queissner designed the Blue Star banner to represent his two sons who were serving on the front line during World War I. The banner became an unofficial way for a family to show they had a child in the services. Over time, the flag has transitioned to represent any family member who is serving in the military during a time of war.

In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson took the banners one step further, suggesting that a gold star cover the blue star when a family member dies while serving his or her country. The blue symbolizes hope; the gold symbolizes sacrifice for freedom.

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