Livestock sale results are big surprise

The numbers for the Madison County Junior Fair livestock sales are in, and they are surprising.

Twenty-two fewer animals were sold, but $16,000 more in premiums were collected over last year.

“Considering the economic realities as they exist right now compared to last year, we wouldn’t have expected this result walking into the sale,” said Kevin Roseberry, who conducts the accounting for the Livestock Sale Committee. “We were very pleasantly surprised.”

The sales took place on the last two nights of the fair, July 11-12. A total of 443 animals and 10 cheese trays (for the dairy exhibitors) were sold. The proceeds go to the 4-Hers and FFA members who exhibited the animals during fair week.

Two streams of revenue go to each sel-ler—the market price, which the Livestock Sale Committee negotiates ahead of time with contracted animal packing com-panies; and the premium, which indivi-duals, businesses and organizations pay to the exhibitors through the live auctions.

This year, the market total for all animals was $73,925 compared to $71,685 last year. The 2008 premium total was $156,350 compared to $140,125 in 2007.

“We had a number of new buyers, but we also had a lot of existing buyers that contributed a little bit more individually, and it all added up,” Roseberry said.

He also noted that the sale committee received more in lump-sum donations from businesses this year to be distributed to exhibitors after the bidding was done. These donations helped to increase the average premiums across all species.

The 2008 Sales Breakdown

The final breakdown by species for the 2008 sales is as follows. Premiums, market prices and boosts are listed:

• Steers—A total of $9,600 in premiums was paid to 16 exhibitors. The average was $600 per animal, up 23.7 percent over 2007. (The market total was $18,170.)

• Feeder calves—A total of $15,025 in premiums was paid to 38 exhibitors. The  average was $395.39 per animal, up 2.8 percent over 2007. (The market total was $14,318.15.)

• Hogs—A total of $67,225 in premiums was paid to 185 exhibitors. The average was $363.38 per animal, an increase of 10.6 percent over 2007. (The market total was $24,082.50.)

• Sheep—A total of $43,425 in premiums was paid to 117 exhibitors. The average was $371.15 per animal, an increase of 24 percent over 2007. (The market total was $15,190.35.)

• Poultry—A total of $8,300 in premiums was paid to 51 exhibitors. The average was $162.75 per project, up 30.6 percent over 2007. (The market total was $232.20.)

• Goats—A total of $8,125 in premiums was paid to 33 exhibitors. The average was $246.21 per animal, an increase of 45.5 percent over 2007. (The market total was $1,885.50.)

• Rabbits—A total of $1,775 in premiums was paid to three exhibitors. The average of $591.67 per project, an increase of 123 percent over 2007. (The market total was $46.50.)

• Cheese Trays (Dairy)—A total of $2,875 in premiums was paid to 10 exhibitors. The average was $287.50 per exhibitor, up 3.6 percent over 2007.

After each species sale, with the excep-tion of dairy, some bidders donated “boosts” to increase the average premium per animal a certain amount, increase the premium on certain animals, or increase the minimum amount each exhibitor earned.

Across the species, the boosts totaled $9,130, up by $5,000 over last year. Of that increase, $2,835 came through boosts made by 45 buyers to Darcey Reed, a rabbit exhibitor whose father, Robin Reed, a London city councilman, died the week of the fair after a bout with cancer.

Giving Back

Just as the amount of money 4-Hers and FFA exhibitors earned at the sales was up, so was the amount the youths donated back to charitable causes. The total contributions across the species was $5,134 compared to $4,111 last year.

The biggest benefactors were the Bill Green Fund and Hog Barn/Pen Fund, both of which support improvements on the fairgrounds. Youths also donated to charities such as the American Cancer Society, ALS Association (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), and the Chris Kelly Scholarship.

Previous articleTwo GC residents honored as heroes
Next articleAnimal Tails: ODNR advises public to leave wild animals alone

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.